FMEA Info Centre

Everything you want to know about Failure Mode and Effect Analysis
Home
Contact
Search
Site Map

Search News Alerts Latest Updates Community Examples Guides and Introductions Handbooks
Books and New Releases Papers - Video Abstracts Presentations Services Standards Tools

Other FMEA Sources

 

FMEA Abstracts (use of search function recommended)

2009 - 2008 - 2007 - 2006 - 2005 - 2004 - 2003 - 2002 - 2001 - 2000 - earlier

  2003


Title: Reducing medication errors and increasing patient safety: Case studies in clinical pharmacology

Source: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Author: Benjamin, DM

Year: 2003

Abstract: Today, reducing medication errors and improving patient safety have become common topics of discussion for the president of the United States, federal and state legislators, the insurance industry, pharmaceutical companies, health care professionals, and patients. But this is not news to clinical pharmacologists. Improving the judicious use of medications and minimizing adverse drug reactions have always been key areas of research and study for those working in clinical pharmacology However, added to the older terms of adverse drug reactions and rational therapeutics, the now politically correct expression of medication error has emerged, Focusing on the word error has drawn attention to "prevention" and what can be done to minimize mistakes and improve patient safety. Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary has several definitions of error, but the one that seems to be most appropriate in the context of medication errors is "an act that through ignorance, deficiency, or accident departs from or fails to achieve what should be done." What should be done is generally known as "the five rights": the right drug, right dose, right route, right time, and right patient. One can make an error of omission (failure to act correctly) or an error of commission (acted incorrectly). This article now summarizes what is currently known about medication errors and translates the information into case studies illustrating common scenarios leading to medication errors. Each case is analyzed to provide insight into how the medication error could have been prevented. "System errors" are described, and the application of failure mode effect analysis (FMEA) is presented to determine the part of the "safety net" that failed, Examples of reengineering the system to make it more "error proof" are presented. An error can be prevented. However, the practice of medicine, pharmacy, and nursing in the hospital setting is very complicated, and so many steps occur from "pen to patient" that there is a lot to analyze. Implementing safer practices requires developing safer systems. Many errors occur as a result of poor oral or written communications. Enhanced communication skills and better interactions among members of the health care team and the patient are essential. The informed consent process should be used as a patient safety tool, and the patient should be warned about material and foreseeable serious side effects and be told what signs and symptoms should be immediately reported to the physician before the patient is forced to go to the emergency department for urgent or emergency care. Last, reducing medication errors is an ongoing process of quality improvement. Faulty systems must be redesigned, and seamless, computerized integrated medication delivery must be instituted by health care professionals adequately trained to use such technological advances, Sloppy handwritten prescriptions should be replaced by computerized physician order entry, a very effective technique for reducing prescribing/ordering errors, but another far less expensive yet effective change would involve writing all drug orders in plain English, rather than continuing to use the elitists' arcane Latin words and shorthand abbreviations that are subject to misinterpretation. After all, effective communication is best accomplished when it is clear and simple.


Title: Analyzing reliability, a simple yet rigorous approach

Source: INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS SOCIETY 50TH ANNUAL PETROLEUM AND CHEMICAL INDUSTRY CONFERENCE

Author: Bono, R; Alexander, R; Dorman, A; Kim, YJ; Reisdorf, J

Year: 2003

Abstract: Reliability of the electrical power system is a critical factor for continuous process operations. This paper presents an analytical method for determining distribution system reliability that can be easily implemented to form a basis for plant improvement studies. The paper demonstrates the implementation of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) techniques based on the IEEE Gold Book. The analysis provides a basis, for informed decisions when selecting systems designed to increase system availability. The analytical techniques are illustrated using two simple distribution schemes and it is shown how the techniques may be applied to systems that are more complex.


Title: An assessment of RPN prioritization in a failure modes effects and criticality analysis

Source: ANNUAL RELIABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM, 2003 PROCEEDINGS

Author: Bowles, JB

Year: 2003

Abstract: The Risk Priority Number methodology for prioritizing failure modes is an integral part of the Automobile FMECA technique. The technique consists of ranking the potential failures from I to 10 with respect to their severity, probability of occurrence, and likelihood of detection in later tests, and multiplying the numbers together. The result is a numerical ranking, called the RPN, on a scale from 1 to 1000. Potential failure modes having higher RPNs are assumed to have a higher design risk than those having lower numbers. Although it is well documented and easy to apply, the method is seriously flawed from a technical perspective. This makes the interpretation of the analysis results problematic. The problems with the methodology include the use of the ordinal ranking numbers as numeric quantities, the presence of holes making up a large part of the RPN measurement scale, duplicate RPN values with very different characteristics, and varying sensitivity to small changes. Recommendations for an improved methodology are also given.


Title: Using failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) and value-added analysis to evaluate antibody identification across three test systems

Source: TRANSFUSION

Author: Casina, TS; South, SF

Year: 2003

Abstract:


Title: Reliability in automotive electronics: a case study applied to diesel engine control

Source: MICROELECTRONICS RELIABILITY

Author: Cassanelli, G; Fantini, F; Serra, G; Sgatti, S

Year: 2003

Abstract: In this paper the problem of the reliability in automotive electronics, applied to the case of diesel engine control, in particularly to the Multijet ECU, is discussed. The aim of this paper is to define methodologies to estimate, to control and to improve reliability in automotive field. The functionality and the complexity of automotive electronic systems are rapidly growing and lead to increased networking, higher degrees of integration, and mechatronic solutions. Some electronic parts are placed under the hood or on the combustion engine or inside the gearbox, where environmental conditions are really harsh in terms of temperature, vibrations and shocks. Consequently, specific approaches in order to assure a high reliability level have been developed. In the first section of the paper the Multijet system is described, then a reliability analysis of the system using the reliability tool FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) and FTA (Fault Tree Analysis) is presented. Eventually, the injector control subsystem is describes and its reliability analysis is presented. In the last part we try to find some links between the two different levels of abstraction in the reliability analysis. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Title: A hybrid rough-cut process planning for quality

Source: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY

Author: Chin, KS; Zheng, LY; Wei, L

Year: 2003

Abstract: This paper proposes a hybrid approach to develop a rough-cut process planning for quality. The approach aims to determine key process alternatives with an adequate process capability by systematic quality planning and assessment methods during the initial planning stage of the product development cycle. It consists of four steps: (1) identification of quality characteristics (2) planning of the process quality by combining quality function deployment (QFD) with the process failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) (3) a selection of process alternatives, and (4) an assessment of process quality through a quality measure index, called the composite process capability (CCP). The process alternatives with an adequate CCP selected during the early design stage can then be not only used as the guidelines for detailed process planning but also as feedback for the product design and other functions for design evaluation and improvement. This approach is helpful to reduce or even eliminate the iterations of modification of process plans. A prototype system called the rough-cut process planning for quality (RPPFQ) has been developed for validation. A case study concerned with a satellite frame part is presented to illustrate the approach and prototype system in this paper.


Title: OF-FMEA: an approach to safety analysis of object-oriented software intensive systems

Source: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS

Author: Cichocki, T; Gorski, J

Year: 2003

Abstract: The paper presents an extension to the common FMEA method in such a way that it can be applied to safety analysis of systems (hardware and software) that are developed using a recently popular object oriented approach. The method makes use of the object and collaboration models of UML. It assumes that the system components are specified formally using the CSP notation. The method supports systematic way of failure mode identification and validation. Selected failure modes are injected to the specification of "normal" behaviour and their consequences are analysed with the help of an automatic tool. The verification process provides hints for possible redesign of components. Experiences of using the method for a railway signalling case study are also reported.


Title: A software reliability methodology using software sneak analysis, SWFMEA and the integrated system analysis approach

Source: ANNUAL RELIABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM, 2003 PROCEEDINGS

Author: Craig, JH

Year: 2003

Abstract: A design analysis on system software can be very beneficial towards obtaining a highly reliable system. For a system to be reliable, it is important to know how the system operates with and without failures to create compensating provisions that could increase overall reliability. Software does not "fail" like hardware where there is an object that can be examined, analyzed and improved upon. Software failures are abstract and consist of logic errors or program paths not intended by the system designers at a specific moment of time. Software based systems have been known to produce these anomalous, unexpected outputs at undesirable times not due to any hardware failures. These unexpected anomalies can be classified as Software Sneak Conditions. To provide full coverage in the analyses approach, a Software Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (SW FMEA) is also performed to examine system effects if functions of the software did not operate as intended because of a software failure. This paper will introduce the Integrated System Analysis (ISA) method of performing a Software Sneak Analysis. The ISA process and tools that capture and model the software functionally and are then used to perform the SW FMEA. The approach discussed using the ISA tools, Software Sneak Analysis and a SW FMEA have been performed and the results of one analysis is presented.


Title: Learning from failures: design improvements using a multiple criteria decision-making process

Source: PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS PART G-JOURNAL OF AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

Author: Davidson, GG; Labib, AW

Year: 2003

Abstract: This paper proposes a new concept of decision analysis based on a multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) process. This is achieved through the provision of a systematic and generic methodology for the implementation of design improvements based on experience of past failures. This is illustrated in the form of a case study identifying the changes made to Concorde after the 2000 accident. The proposed model uses the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) mathematical model as a backbone and integrates elements of a modified failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA). The AHP has proven to be an invaluable tool for decision support since it allows a fully documented and transparent decision to be made with full accountability. In addition, it facilitates the task of justifying improvement decisions. The paper is divided as follows: the first section presents an outline of the background to the Concorde accident and its history of related (non-catastrophic) malfunctions. The AHP methodology and its mathematical representation are then presented with the integrated FMEA applied to the Concorde accident. The case study arrives at the same conclusion as engineers working on Concorde after the accident: that the aircraft may fly again if the lining of the fuel tanks are modified.


Title: The role of safety analyses in reducing products liability exposure in "smart" consumer products containing software and firmware

Source: ANNUAL RELIABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM, 2003 PROCEEDINGS

Author: Hecht, M

Year: 2003

Abstract: Sales of products with embedded computing devices are growing, and it is inevitable that serious injuries and deaths in which the firmware was a substantial or causative factor will occur. Liability for firmware defects, whether classified as manufacturing or design defects, will ultimately be tied to the diligence of the developer in production of safe code. If the developer made a reasonable effort to foresee potential hazards in the course of developing the requirements and designing the software or firmware, and if the development process followed by the designers and programmers was disciplined, the developer will have a substantial defense. If, on the other hand, the developer can not document the effort made to foresee potential hazards and misuses of the product or can not demonstrate that the code was developed in a responsible and disciplined manner, then the exposure to liability will be much greater. This result is in accordance with the social objectives of advancing consumer products technology. Successful consumer products manufacturers will find the middle ground between exposing the consumer to excessive risk and depriving the consumer of useful services and features. Overly cautious manufacturers who do not invest in developing products that provide a greater service to the consumer will be threatened by more aggressive competitors. On the other hand, overly aggressive competitors will be exposing themselves to products liability claims because of injuries caused by imprudent release of defective products to the marketplace. There are millions of accidents caused by consumer products each year, and an increasing number will be related to the firmware contained in embedded computing devices. These accidents are unfortunately not totally avoidable. However, a proactive safety analysis and failure reporting methodology will reduce the likelihood and severity of such accidents over the long run. This outcome benefits society as a whole. In the shorter run, safety methodologies that demonstrate a sincere commitment to product safety will be an effective defense. Use of such a methodology will benefit manufacturers by reducing the likelihood of a plaintiff prevailing against the manufacturer.


Title: An approach to discovering risks in development process of large and complex systems

Source: NEW GENERATION COMPUTING

Author: Kato, Y; Shirakawa, T; Taketa, K; Hori, K

Year: 2003

Abstract: When building a large and complex system, such as satellites, all sorts of risks have to be managed if it were to be successful. For risks in the design of an artifact, various reliability analysis techniques such as FTA or FMEA have been employed in the engineering domain. However; risks exist as well in the development process, and they could result in a failure of the system. In this paper, we present an approach to discovering risks in development process by collecting and organizing information produced during development process at low cost. We describe a prototype system called IDIMS, and show how it can be used to discover risks from e-mail communications between developers. The motivation of our work is to overcome the capture bottleneck problem, and utilize now wasted information to improve development process.


Title: Requirement for a joint zero-defect strategy - a legal view

Source: STAHL UND EISEN

Author: Kramer, B; Wilcke, M

Year: 2003

Abstract: The realisation of products as "defect-free" as possible requires knowledge of the entire process chain. For this reason a "Failure Mode and Effects Analysis" (FMEA) has been conducted for high-tensile suspension springs, drawing on all available expertise. The project was coordinated by the German Association for the Spring Industry (Verband der Deutschen Federnindustrie). The goal of this system product FMEA is to enable the early detection and avoidance of defects by breaking down the process chain according to possible defect sequences, defect types, defect causes, and detection and improvement measures. The article goes on to explain why, also from a legal view, several points speak in favour of jointly pursuing the zero-defect strategy, preferably by way of such a system product FMEA embracing the complete process chain, in collaboration with all those involved in production. Essentially, there are four points: Beside the new legal situation under the law of obligations also the fact that the zero-defect goal cannot be achieved by giving guarantees of certain product qualities in quality assurance agreements. Third point is the circumstance that there are liability risks which cannot be excluded at a legal level, with the consequence that those concerned must have an interest in excluding them at the factual level, namely by preventing defective products as effectively as possible. Last but not least there is the facilitation of exoneration from reproach of failure to comply with obligations within the scope of the producer's liability in tort.


Title: Facing the challenges of service automation: An enabler for e-commerce and productivity gain in traditional services

Source: IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT

Author: Linton, JD

Year: 2003

Abstract: Business plan, psychological factors, and operational issues are three major reasons, that internet-based businesses fail. This paper considers why operational concerns occur and illustrates how they can be avoided, by demonstrating the application of techniques that were pioneered in manufacturing automation and service management. The use of process mapping and failure mode effect analysis (FMEA) can assist the development of e-commerce business processes in a manner similar to the way these tools have proven valuable in manufacturing. The use and value of process mapping and FMEA are demonstrated, through the development of an online auction process.


Title: Development of error-compensating UI for autonomous production cells

Source: ERGONOMICS

Author: Luczak, H; Reuth, R; Schmidt, L

Year: 2003

Abstract: This contribution deals with the impact of human error on the overall system reliability in flexible manufacturing systems (FMS). Autonomous production cells are used to illustrate an error-compensating system design on the basis of Sheridan's (1997) paradigm of supervisory control. In order to specify human errors and their effects in terms of system disturbances, a taxonomy of system disturbances is recommended. This taxonomic approach was derived by a value benefit analysis and is based on HEDOMS (Human Error and Disturbance Occurrence in Manufacturing Systems) with slight modifications and Reason's GEMS (Generic Error Modelling System). The taxonomy is used for data acquisition. Next, a risk priority equivalent to FMEA (Failure Mode and Effect Analysis) is introduced to structure the data according to their relevance. Then, Vicente's and Rasmussen's guidelines (1987) for an ecological interface design are related to the paradigm of supervisory control. On the basis of these guidelines four case studies are presented to show their successful applicability for interface design in FMS..


Title: Ensuring system safety is more efficient

Source: AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING AND AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY

Author: Lunde, K

Year: 2003

Abstract: With continuously shrinking time to market and ever increasing requirements regarding product quality and safety, efficiency is crucial in system development. in contrast to classical simulation tools, the model-based simulation and diagnosis tool RODON sup-ports a wide range of analyses based on a single product model. Besides the resultant considerable reduction of modeling effort, it helps to increase safety and efficiency by automating tasks which traditionally involve a substantial amount of manual labour, like failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA). Considering a model of a typical fly-by-wire system as example, this paper describes a few ways how the system engineer can benefit from RODON to enhance system safety and quality, from FMEA to model-based diagnosis. The main focus of the study was the investigation of sensor tolerances and their impact both on the system behavior and on the fault detection by the system's monitoring functions.


Title: Assessing patient safety risk before the injury occurs: an introduction to sociotechnical probabilistic risk modelling in health care

Source: QUALITY & SAFETY IN HEALTH CARE

Author: Marx, DA; Slonim, AD

Year: 2003

Abstract: Since 1 July 2001 the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations ( JCAHO) has required each accredited hospital to conduct at least one proactive risk assessment annually. Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was recommended as one tool for conducting this task. This paper examines the limitations of FMEA and introduces a second tool used by the aviation and nuclear industries to examine low frequency, high impact events in complex systems. The adapted tool, known as sociotechnical probabilistic risk assessment (ST-PRA), provides an alternative for proactively identifying, prioritizing, and mitigating patient safety risk. The uniqueness of ST-PRA is its ability to model combinations of equipment failures, human error, at risk behavioral norms, and recovery opportunities through the use of fault trees. While ST-PRA is a complex, high end risk modelling tool, it provides an opportunity to visualize system risk in a manner that is not possible through FMEA.


Title: A process for failure modes and effects analysis of computer software

Source: ANNUAL RELIABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM, 2003 PROCEEDINGS

Author: Ozarin, N; Siracusa, M

Year: 2003

Abstract: Software FMEA is a means to determine whether any single failure in computer software can cause catastrophic system effects, and additionally identifies other possible consequences of unexpected software behavior. The procedure described here was developed and used to analyze mission- and safety-critical software systems. The procedure includes using a structured approach to understanding the subject software, developing rules and tools for doing the analysis as a group effort with minimal data entry and human error, and generating a final report. Software FMEA is a kind of implementation analysis that is an intrinsically tedious process but database tools make the process reasonably painless, highly accurate, and very thorough. The main focus here is on development and use of these database tools.


Title: Modified failure mode and effects analysis using approximate reasoning

Source: RELIABILITY ENGINEERING & SYSTEM SAFETY

Author: Pillay, A; Wang, J

Year: 2003

Abstract: The marine industry is recognising the powerful techniques that can be used to perform risk analysis of marine systems. One technique that has been applied in both national and international marine regulations and operations is failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA). This risk analysis tool assumes a failure mode, which occurs in a system/component through some failure mechanism; the effect of this failure is then evaluated. A risk ranking is produced in order to prioritise the attention for each of the failure modes identified. The traditional method utilises the risk priority number (RPN) ranking system. This method determines the RPN by finding the multiplication of factor scores. The three factors considered are probability of failure, severity and delectability. Traditional FMEA has been criticised to have several drawbacks. These drawbacks are addressed in this paper. A new proposed approach, which utilises the fuzzy rules base and grey relation theory is presented. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All-rights reserved.


Title: Using cost based FMEA to enhance reliability and serviceability

Source: ADVANCED ENGINEERING INFORMATICS

Author: Rhee, SJ; Ishii, K

Year: 2003

Abstract: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a design tool that mitigates risks during the design phase before they occur. Although many industries use the current FMEA technique, it has many limitations and problems. Risk is measured in terms of Risk Priority Number (RPN) that is a product of occurrence, severity, and detection difficulty. Measuring severity and detection difficulty is very subjective and with no universal scale. RPN is also a product of ordinal variables, which is not meaningful as a proper measure. This paper addresses these shortcomings and introduces a new methodology, Life Cost-Based FMEA, which measures risk in terms of cost. Life Cost-Based FMEA is useful for comparing and selecting design alternatives that can reduce the overall life cycle cost of a particular system. Next, a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to the Cost-Based FMEA to account for the uncertainties in: detection time, fixing time, occurrence, delay time, down time, and model complex scenarios. A case study of a large scale particle accelerator shows the advantages of the proposed approach in predicting life cycle failure cost, measuring risk and planning preventive, scheduled maintenance and ultimately improving up-time. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Title: Eight essential tools

Source: QUALITY PROGRESS

Author: Snee, RD

Year: 2003

Abstract:


Title: Rectifying FMEA - The Inter-Crossing method

Source: ANNUAL RELIABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM, 2003 PROCEEDINGS

Author: Sneor, A

Year: 2003

Abstract:


Title: Using failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) to evaluate two transfusion services' current manual tube and manual gel methods with ProVue (TM) for antibody detection testing

Source: TRANSFUSION

Author: South, SF; Harte, M; Hegarty, J

Year: 2003

Abstract:


Title: Process qualification strategy for advanced embedded non-volatile memory technology - The Philips' 0.18 mu m embedded flash case

Source: 41ST ANNUAL PROCEEDINGS: INTERNATIONAL RELIABILITY PHYSICS SYMPOSIUM

Author: Tao, GQ; Scarpa, A; van Dijk, K; Kuper, FG

Year: 2003

Abstract: A qualification strategy for advanced embedded non-volatile memory technology has been revealed. This strategy consists of: thorough understanding of the requirements, extensive use and frequent update of the FMEA (failure mode effect analysis), a qualification plan with excellent coverage of all the risk areas, implementing effective in-line and off-line measures and control, and check-off of all the tests with good results. With such a strategy in place, the Philips' 0.18mum embedded flash technology has been successfully qualified for volume production.


Title: Retrograde progress of reliability analysis methods

Source: ANNUAL RELIABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM, 2003 PROCEEDINGS

Author: Wild, A

Year: 2003

Abstract: Several examples are presented to show how some development of reliability analysis methods has led to a resurgence of mistakes and pitfalls, which were believed to have been resolved a long time ago. A review of those cases indicates that the major cause of this undesirable outcome is the emphasis on procedures, while overlooking the importance of definitions and basic concepts, including the statement of attached limitations. A change in the attitude towards the teaching, development and application of reliability analysis methods will be needed to prevent serious problems.


Title: Reliability concepts applied to manufacturing processes planning

Source: ISUMA 2003: FOURTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON UNCERTAINTY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

Author: Souza, GFM; Marcicano, JPP; Rodriguez, CEP; Tomaz, DM

Year: 2003

Abstract: This paper presents a reliability analysis of a precision drilling process used in the manufacturing of aircraft structural components. After a brief introduction to the precision drilling manufacturing process, a reliability analysis is executed through the application of the FMEA technique, defining the process main failures and their consequences to the manufactured part. The statistical process control capability indices are proposed as estimates of the process failure rate. To evaluate the process failure rate and capability an experimental study is developed with test specimens. Based on the test results, the drilling procedure for aluminum is accepted and the procedure for titanium is rejected.


Title: Reliability/mistake-proofing using Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA)

Source: ASQ'S 57TH ANNUAL QUALITY CONGRESS PROCEEDINGS

Author: Terninko, J

Year: 2003

Abstract: Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a structured way to identify and prioritize the failure modes in the system of interest. FMEA is one way to increase the reliability of a system before anything happens but can be used after an event. One of the methods to increase the time between failures/errors is to make the system mistake-proof. A small portion of a complete system for administration of chemotherapy is shown. The FMEA process is shown for only one task. FMEA does not demonstrate how to identify failure modes nor how to create solutions. Two methods (System Context and Gemba) to help identify failures are briefly presented. Four methods (Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, Lead Users, Mistake-proofing and Robust Design) to help identify solution concepts are briefly presented.


Title: Basis for the reliability analysis of the proton linac for an ADS program

Source: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2003 PARTICLE ACCELERATOR CONFERENCE, VOLS 1-5

Author: Barni, D; Michelato, P; Monaco, L; Novati, M; Pagani, C; Paulon, R; Pierini, P; Sertore, D; Burgazzi, L

Year: 2003

Abstract: In the framework of the ADS projects (Accelerator Driven System) developing worldwide, a reliability activity is on going to validate and qualify the linac accelerator design with focus on the general operational and design characteristics that shape the accelerator performance. Further quantitative results should be based on estimations mostly deriving from operational surveys at existing accelerator facilities. Currently, a validated accelerator component reliability data base has not yet been assembled, and because of the early stage of the ADS design in which several systems are not established at this time the topic can be addressed by the application of a preliminary FMEA (Failure Mode and Effect Analysis) methodology, helpful in the identification of reliability-critical areas, where modifications to the design can help to reduce the probability of system failures. In this paper, the preliminary results of this activity are presented together with possible solutions to improve the reliability of the reference linac design.


Title: Cost based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for systems of accelerator magnets

Source: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2003 PARTICLE ACCELERATOR CONFERENCE, VOLS 1-5

Author: Spencer, CM; Rhee, SJ

Year: 2003

Abstract: The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC) has a proposed 85% overall availability goal, the availability specifications for all its 7200 magnets and their 6167 power supplies are 97.5% each. Thus all of the electromagnets and their power supplies must be highly reliable or quickly repairable. Improved reliability or repairability comes at a higher cost. We have developed a set of analysis procedures for magnet designers to use as they decide how much effort to exert, i.e. how much money to spend, to improve the reliability of a particular style of magnet. We show these procedures being applied to a standard SLAC electromagnet design in order to make it reliable enough to meet the NLC availability specs. First, empirical data from SLAC's accelerator failure database plus design experience are used to calculate MTBF for failure modes identified through a FMEA. Availability for one particular magnet can be calculated. Next, labor and material costs to repair magnet failures are used in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the total cost of all failures over a 30-year lifetime. Opportunity costs are included. Engineers choose from amongst various designs by comparing lifecycle costs.


Title: Applying software FMEA

Source: NINTH ISSAT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RELIABILITY AND QUALITY IN DESIGN, 2003 PROCEEDINGS

Author: Zenzen, F; Twaites, G; Keats, JB; Fowler, JW

Year: 2003

Abstract: Today's companies need to produce defect-free software that meets customer requirements. Critical customer requirements must operate prior to delivery. One way to ensure customer satisfaction is to use Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to identify critical requirements and implementation strategies during project planning. A cost-effective software implementation strategy is provided. The strategy integrates FMEA into the software development process. Data from fifteen completed software development projects is used as a basis for FMEA planning applications.

 Your paper, publication or book is missing? You have a better review?

Inform our webmaster.

Add a link Recommend this site Link to this site About this site Status

FMEA Info Centre

All you want to know about Failure Mode and Effect Analysis
Home
Contact
Search
Site Map